Completion of a Traditional Scrapbook, Part 5: Familiarize

12 Jan

This step is just a baby step it goes so fast, and if you’re not in a hurry, you really can skip it (I know that sounds funny, but the process is quicker for me when I include this): familiarize yourself with your photos and your decorative supplies. I’m pretty familiar with my photos for this album now: I chose which ones I wanted printed, I sorted them, and now I’ve cropped them. Today I opened up the packages for my decorative supplies and got to know them — SO much fun! I am loving the Reminisce designs; they remind me of CM’s retired Vintage designs that I loved so much I used them in 5 albums!

Decorative Supplies

I opened all the packages up, and checked out all the designs and word art. I stored it all in my Power Palette Case so that I can get to it easily. You can also see in the photo that I cut out one part of the packaging to keep — the small representative pictures of the paper designs. It makes it easy for me to reference while I’m choosing paper.

I like the next step, Power Layouts, to go as quickly as possible because it takes up the most space — so this is also the time I think about those photos I am celebrating, and consider cutting out paper shapes with the Creative Cuts System or any of my CM cartridges for my Cricut machine. If I decide I want to have those shapes, I will cut them now. Again, my style is “simply decorative,” so I personally tend not to do much of that — perhaps three or four for the whole album. Feel free to do much more if you like!

© Carolyn Gordon and Cropping with Care, 2011. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from Carolyn Gordon is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Carolyn Gordon and Cropping with Care with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. Carolyn Gordon is an independent consultant and the opinions and content on this site are not necessarily endorsed by Creative Memories. Power Layouts, Power Palette, and Creative Cuts are trademarks of Creative Memories. Reminisce designs are © Creative Memories.

Completion of a Traditional Scrapbook, Part 4: Crop Your Photos

11 Jan

Cropping SessionI guess you could call my scrapbooking style “simply decorative.” If that’s not your style, you may actually want to incorporate this next step in our album-making  — cropping your photos* — in with the step where pages are laid out (especially if you prefer to recreate page layouts from idea books). I like to crop my photos ahead of time for a few reasons:

  1. If I crop before laying out pages, doing so takes up very little space. Today I set up a couple of TV trays and got it done in bits between today’s appointments. (The Power Layouts step coming soon takes up as much table space as can be spared — so having my photos “pre-cropped” also gets the table cleared again for my family as soon as possible.)
  2. I like to crop to the picture. If there are distracting backgrounds that I can eliminate, I do that. If the subject of the photo is round, I’ll trim the photo in a circle. This serves my style, but doesn’t always work with layouts where you need the photos to be a certain size or shape.

I typically don’t use all the tools in my scrapbooking arsenal for a single album. For trimming my photos, I used my Personal Trimmer (my very favorite traditional scrapbooking tool) and my Custom Cutting System. With the Custom Cutting System, I only used the Circle and Oval Patterns — the “fancier” shapes I tend to use with paper more than with photos. I did toss a few more photographs that I decided were either not good enough for the album, or that were nearly the same as some others.

I’m just about ready to start putting it all together! If I have time tomorrow, there are just a couple more time-savers that I will try to get out of the way before laying out my pages — because they’ll make designing those pages that much quicker!

*Make sure you don’t crop Polaroids!

© Carolyn Gordon and Cropping with Care, 2011. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from Carolyn Gordon is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Carolyn Gordon and Cropping with Care with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. Carolyn Gordon is an independent consultant and the opinions and content on this site are not necessarily endorsed by Creative Memories. Power Layouts, Personal Trimmer, and Custom Cutting System are trademarks of Creative Memories.

 

Completion of a Traditional Scrapbook, Part 3: Sort

10 Jan

Photos and Memorabilia All SortedMy photos arrived a few days ago, and I have been a busy gal getting some other projects accomplished. Today though, I had some time to direct to my 2008 family scrapbook project. Now that I had my photo prints and my memorabilia, I set out to get them in the proper order. Some of you may notice in the photo that I’m using some older Creative Memories products to do this; there are similar newer versions available now.

I like to get my photos sorted first (though if I’d had the time while waiting for the prints to arrive, I would have started with the memorabilia). It’s usually very quick and easy, because the CM Digital Center prints photos in the order you put them in the online shopping cart. The Power Sort Box comes with dividers, which I label with regular pencil (easily erased for use on future projects — but be sure to use our Photo Labeling Pencil on the back of actual photos). Because this is an album for my 2008 family photos, I decided to label the dividers one for each month. If I were making a vacation album, I might divide the photos by day of the trip, or by city if we had visited several on a road trip. Anything I might consider “chapters” in my “book.” I like to sort the pictures into the space in front of  the divider they belong with, because it makes the divider tab easier to read. Sorting my photos for 2008 went very quickly.

Then I began to sort my memorabilia. This was not so quick, because I have been lazy for the past three years with the mementos I have collected! I’ve thrown tickets, programs, invitations, etc., into a box to look through later. One of these days I hope I learn my lesson and just sort the memorabilia as I collect it. At any rate, though it took longer, it was still easily managed and is now finished (along with that from 2009 and 2010)! I labeled my memorabilia folders using regular pencil as well.

Here is why I usually try to sort my photos first: while I’m sorting my memorabilia, I add a little asterisk to the label of the dividers my photos are sorted in for each section for which I have memorabilia. That way, while I’m laying out pages, when I come to a new section in my photos, I have a visual cue to tell me I need to look for the memorabilia that goes with them. It can be difficult to make room for the memorabilia after the pages are finished!

© Carolyn Gordon and Cropping with Care, 2011. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from Carolyn Gordon is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Carolyn Gordon and Cropping with Care with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. Carolyn Gordon is an independent consultant and the opinions and content on this site are not necessarily endorsed by Creative Memories. Power Sort is a trademark of Creative Memories.

Pictures Are Cheap; Memories Are Priceless

4 Jan

picture of flowersI’m not working on my 2008 family album project today, but I do want to share some numbers with you. My family took nearly 2500 pictures in 2008 (for which I kept the photo files; numerous others were deleted). Of those, I chose about 400 to print for this album. As I go through the next couple of steps toward completion, the number of pictures I’m using may get smaller still. (Some of the unprinted pictures I have are destined for other albums, but most won’t be used.)

My point is that you do not have to scrapbook every photo you take! Photography has come a long way in a short time. Taking digital pictures costs nothing, and prints are very inexpensive. It is more important to me that the events and the everyday of my family’s life are remembered and kept as a legacy for my children, than having every photo in an album. I can choose, celebrate, and display the best of the bunch! Editing down the number of photos I preserve in albums, and keeping my album-making and my album pages simple, are the main ways completed scrapbooks (whether traditional or digital) are possible for me.

Just something to consider! :) And by the way, even if I were to change my scrapbooking style to a highly designer-decorative one (and if I had that talent!), the steps I use to complete scrapbooks would remain the same. You artists out there can still follow along with the steps I’m laying out!

© Carolyn Gordon and Cropping with Care, 2011. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from Carolyn Gordon is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Carolyn Gordon and Cropping with Care with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. Carolyn Gordon is an independent consultant and the opinions and content on this site are not necessarily endorsed by Creative Memories.

Completion of a Traditional Scrapbook, Part 2: Order What You Need

3 Jan

Project SuppliesIn the first step of creating a traditional scrapbook, you made some decisions. The next step is ordering what you want to use but don’t have yet. For many of us, that will include ordering the coverset, pages, protectors, and decorative supplies we decided on. Luckily enough, what I want to use (shown here) was all in my inventory, so I just pulled it out for myself.

I did need to order prints of my photos, though. I opened up Memory Manager and chose to view the photos taken in 2008, went through to choose which ones I wanted to print, and edited red-eye out of a few of them that I hadn’t gotten to yet. This was really fun! One of the reasons I do this is that it is so enjoyable to look through memories! (Another thought that occurred to me is that I’m glad I have a better camera now than I did then. ;-) After that, I uploaded them to the Creative Memories Digital Center and ordered prints. (Uploading took the most time, but I didn’t need to sit at my computer — I got other things done while that was happening.)

If you are following along, do you have all your pictures printed that you want to have for this album? Do you have the supplies you want? If not, order them now! We’ll have a few days before I expect my prints in the mail (I’m not on a gift-giving deadline with this album), and the next step will involve something I can accomplish while I wait for them.

ETA: One more thing you might want to order at this time if you don’t have one is the Power Layouts Kit. I use it every time I complete a traditional scrapbook!

© Carolyn Gordon and Cropping with Care, 2011. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from Carolyn Gordon is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Carolyn Gordon and Cropping with Care with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. Carolyn Gordon is an independent consultant and the opinions and content on this site are not necessarily endorsed by Creative Memories. Memory Manager and Power Layouts are trademarks of Creative Memories. Product designs are © Creative Memories.

Completion of a Traditional Scrapbook, Part 1: Think About It

2 Jan

I am getting a little behind in my annual albums, and I think that it’s because at one point I decided, Hey I’ll just do digital from now on–it’s so quick and easy! Well, yes, it is, but if you have a lot of memorabilia, scanning isn’t that fun and it is very time-consuming. And those Creative Memories traditional album covers are SO beautiful. So I’ve decided that my family 2008 album is going to be traditional.

Now I am a busy gal, and I know a lot of you are too, so I thought I’d take you along on my journey of completing a traditional scrapbook. I will not have time to work on my album every day, and you will get some insight on how I keep it simple. Some of these processes are the same I go through for a digital album, but I think people need more help simplifying traditional scrapbooking. Sometimes it is faster for me than digital! The first step is just to think about what you want to accomplish!

  1. What story will your next album tell? What photos and memorabilia will you need to find, print, etc., for it? Just think about it and decide.
  2. What Power Palette System design will be best-suited for this story? Just think about it and decide.
  3. What album coverset will be just right for that Power Palette? Just think about it and decide.
  4. Finally, what color pages will you use? Just think… well, you get the idea.

That’s all I’ve got time to do on my album today. For my project, these are my answers to the above questions:

  1. My album will tell the story of my family’s life in 2008. I’ll need our 2008 family photos and memorabilia, but I won’t use our vacation photos, the kids’ birthdays, or the annual Santa picture, because I keep separate albums for those occasions.
  2. I’ve decided I can’t wait to get my hands on the Reminisce Power Palette System and use it–it’s great for heritage albums, but I want it in my family album. Though the system is enough to complete an entire album, I also want to use the Reminisce Christmas and Winter Additions and the Hanukkah Additions, because they fit the photos I’ve got from that year. (If Reminisce Easter was available, I’d use that, too, but I am NOT going to wait for as-yet-non-existent products to complete my albums!)
  3. The Moss coverset was made for the Reminisce Power Palette–I have one that has a beautiful imprint that is no longer available; if I didn’t have that one, I’d get it imprinted with a beautiful Persona design.
  4. I will use Natural colored pages. For me, having white pages waiting to be filled begins a session of Writer’s Block! Also, it’s easier for me to feel like I don’t have to cover every bit of the page when I use something other than white. :)

© Carolyn Gordon and Cropping with Care, 2011. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from Carolyn Gordon is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Carolyn Gordon and Cropping with Care with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. Carolyn Gordon is an independent consultant and the opinions and content on this site are not necessarily endorsed by Creative Memories. Power Palette is a trademark of Creative Memories. Reminisce Power Palette designs are © Creative Memories.

Camera Set to the Wrong Date or Time?

18 Sep

For the past few days, I have been organizing and editing photos and memorabilia for a digital StoryBook of our summer family vacation. All of our jpegs came from 3 different cameras, 1 camera phone, and memorabilia scanned after our return. Having been through this before, I had reminded everyone at the beginning of our trip to “synchronize our cameras” so that everything would automatically sort just so in Memory Manager.

I had to set the date and time for each piece of scanned memorabilia of course, but as I was going through the photos I realized that one camera was set to AM when it should have been PM, and another didn’t get changed mid-trip when we crossed time zone boundaries. With nearly 1000 photos, I did not want to go through them individually to correct them.

I do hope that someday Memory Manager has a feature to change the “offset” of the time it thinks a group of photos was taken, but I wanted to find something that would help me today (Memory Manager does let you set a group of photos to the same date and time right now, but not to a particular difference from the time currently stored in each photo). I did a quick search on the net and found a quick-and-dirty free utility called jhead (for the fact that it edits jpeg headers). You have to be either technical or of-a-certain-computer-user-age to use this program–because it runs from the old-fashioned command prompt, youngsters aren’t likely to want to try it. And, of course, neither I nor Creative Memories claim any responsibility for the program; someone brilliant with no affiliation wrote it.

But if you need to be saved like I needed to be today, it might be worth a look!

© Carolyn Gordon and Cropping with Care, 2010. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from Carolyn Gordon is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Carolyn Gordon and Cropping with Care with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. Carolyn Gordon is an independent consultant and the opinions and content on this site are not necessarily endorsed by Creative Memories. StoryBook and Memory Manager are trademarks of Creative Memories.