Tag Archives: traditional scrapbooking

Completion of a Traditional Scrapbook, Part 7: Adhering

16 Jan

I’m away for the weekend, having a great time scrapbooking and knitting with friends. Yesterday I took the next step toward a completed album: I used my Tape Runner and adhered all the laid-out photos, papers, and embellishments to those 60 pages I prepared a couple of days before. I had more photos to go in this album, and needed more pages, so I did a very quick Power Layouts session (Part 6) on a couple of beds in one of the retreat bedrooms, and then adhered those pages, to finish up. (Not sure I’d recommend this for more than a few pages, as you have to bend over a lot more!)

Now my album is almost done. All 70 page sides are adhered, and I put the pages in my coverset. The next step will be journaling, but I’m waiting to join my family back home for that — they remember some things better than I do!

© Carolyn Gordon and Cropping with Care, 2011. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from Carolyn Gordon is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Carolyn Gordon and Cropping with Care with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. Carolyn Gordon is an independent consultant and the opinions and content on this site are not necessarily endorsed by Creative Memories. Power Layouts and Tape Runner are trademarks of Creative Memories. Reminisce designs are © Creative Memories.

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Completion of a Traditional Scrapbook, Part 6: Power Layouts

14 Jan

Today I laid out sixty (60) scrapbook pages. It took the better part of the afternoon and early evening with a few breaks, but I like to focus on this scrapbooking step, Power Layouts, till it’s done because it takes up space. It’s not something I can just leave out for awhile and work on from time to time throughout the week.

Before we get into Power Layouts, I want to show you the paper I cut yesterday as an extra baby-step toward laying out pages. I cut out more shapes than I normally do for an album, because I was just having too much fun! I then glued some to their shadow-papers with the Precision Point Adhesive. They were ready to go for today!

When setting up for Power Layouts, the general idea is to use as much space as you can in a way where you have access to what you use. At the moment, our good tables are being used for other things, so I grabbed two plastic 6-footers out of our garage and plopped them right in the middle of the den. I stood the entire time I was laying out pages, so no chairs to get in the way. On one table, I laid out my pages using the Power Layouts Kit, and on the other, I had my tools, decorative supplies, pages — oh, and my photos and memorabilia, of course! Notice that my Creative Cuts Collection and my Cricut machine aren’t set out — one of the reasons I pre-cut those shapes pictured above yesterday was so I wouldn’t need all my tools out. (Fewer choices to make at any given time makes scrapbooking go much faster, too.)

I am not going to go into the nitty-gritty of how to do Power Layouts here; you should ask your Creative Memories Consultant to teach you. And I didn’t come up with the method that I use, so I feel like it would almost be plagiarism to write about how I do it here. You will not believe how much quicker it goes until you try it. Let me emphasize that the Power Layouts Kit is my 2nd-favorite traditional scrapbooking tool because it makes scrapping so much faster (right behind the Personal Trimmer)! Ask your Consultant about the every-other page method of using this tool, also — I will never use it any other way (and if you know the name of the brilliant Consultant who came up with that method, please credit her in the comments)!

One more thing to note: my scrapbook is not complete quite yet. My laid-out pages are now safely stored in my Power Layouts Box, ready to be assembled later; nothing is adhered to pages at the moment. And I’ll have a few more to lay out afterward; I have the Power Layouts Kit and one additional pack of Power Layouts Dividers. Using the every-other page method, that allows me to lay out no more than sixty pages at a time.

© Carolyn Gordon and Cropping with Care, 2011. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from Carolyn Gordon is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Carolyn Gordon and Cropping with Care with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. Carolyn Gordon is an independent consultant and the opinions and content on this site are not necessarily endorsed by Creative Memories. Power Layouts, Precision Point Adhesive, and Creative Cuts are trademarks of Creative Memories. Reminisce designs are © Creative Memories.

Completion of a Traditional Scrapbook, Part 5: Familiarize

12 Jan

This step is just a baby step it goes so fast, and if you’re not in a hurry, you really can skip it (I know that sounds funny, but the process is quicker for me when I include this): familiarize yourself with your photos and your decorative supplies. I’m pretty familiar with my photos for this album now: I chose which ones I wanted printed, I sorted them, and now I’ve cropped them. Today I opened up the packages for my decorative supplies and got to know them — SO much fun! I am loving the Reminisce designs; they remind me of CM’s retired Vintage designs that I loved so much I used them in 5 albums!

Decorative Supplies

I opened all the packages up, and checked out all the designs and word art. I stored it all in my Power Palette Case so that I can get to it easily. You can also see in the photo that I cut out one part of the packaging to keep — the small representative pictures of the paper designs. It makes it easy for me to reference while I’m choosing paper.

I like the next step, Power Layouts, to go as quickly as possible because it takes up the most space — so this is also the time I think about those photos I am celebrating, and consider cutting out paper shapes with the Creative Cuts System or any of my CM cartridges for my Cricut machine. If I decide I want to have those shapes, I will cut them now. Again, my style is “simply decorative,” so I personally tend not to do much of that — perhaps three or four for the whole album. Feel free to do much more if you like!

© Carolyn Gordon and Cropping with Care, 2011. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from Carolyn Gordon is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Carolyn Gordon and Cropping with Care with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. Carolyn Gordon is an independent consultant and the opinions and content on this site are not necessarily endorsed by Creative Memories. Power Layouts, Power Palette, and Creative Cuts are trademarks of Creative Memories. Reminisce designs are © Creative Memories.

Completion of a Traditional Scrapbook, Part 4: Crop Your Photos

11 Jan

Cropping SessionI guess you could call my scrapbooking style “simply decorative.” If that’s not your style, you may actually want to incorporate this next step in our album-making  — cropping your photos* — in with the step where pages are laid out (especially if you prefer to recreate page layouts from idea books). I like to crop my photos ahead of time for a few reasons:

  1. If I crop before laying out pages, doing so takes up very little space. Today I set up a couple of TV trays and got it done in bits between today’s appointments. (The Power Layouts step coming soon takes up as much table space as can be spared — so having my photos “pre-cropped” also gets the table cleared again for my family as soon as possible.)
  2. I like to crop to the picture. If there are distracting backgrounds that I can eliminate, I do that. If the subject of the photo is round, I’ll trim the photo in a circle. This serves my style, but doesn’t always work with layouts where you need the photos to be a certain size or shape.

I typically don’t use all the tools in my scrapbooking arsenal for a single album. For trimming my photos, I used my Personal Trimmer (my very favorite traditional scrapbooking tool) and my Custom Cutting System. With the Custom Cutting System, I only used the Circle and Oval Patterns — the “fancier” shapes I tend to use with paper more than with photos. I did toss a few more photographs that I decided were either not good enough for the album, or that were nearly the same as some others.

I’m just about ready to start putting it all together! If I have time tomorrow, there are just a couple more time-savers that I will try to get out of the way before laying out my pages — because they’ll make designing those pages that much quicker!

*Make sure you don’t crop Polaroids!

© Carolyn Gordon and Cropping with Care, 2011. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from Carolyn Gordon is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Carolyn Gordon and Cropping with Care with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. Carolyn Gordon is an independent consultant and the opinions and content on this site are not necessarily endorsed by Creative Memories. Power Layouts, Personal Trimmer, and Custom Cutting System are trademarks of Creative Memories.

 

Completion of a Traditional Scrapbook, Part 3: Sort

10 Jan

Photos and Memorabilia All SortedMy photos arrived a few days ago, and I have been a busy gal getting some other projects accomplished. Today though, I had some time to direct to my 2008 family scrapbook project. Now that I had my photo prints and my memorabilia, I set out to get them in the proper order. Some of you may notice in the photo that I’m using some older Creative Memories products to do this; there are similar newer versions available now.

I like to get my photos sorted first (though if I’d had the time while waiting for the prints to arrive, I would have started with the memorabilia). It’s usually very quick and easy, because the CM Digital Center prints photos in the order you put them in the online shopping cart. The Power Sort Box comes with dividers, which I label with regular pencil (easily erased for use on future projects — but be sure to use our Photo Labeling Pencil on the back of actual photos). Because this is an album for my 2008 family photos, I decided to label the dividers one for each month. If I were making a vacation album, I might divide the photos by day of the trip, or by city if we had visited several on a road trip. Anything I might consider “chapters” in my “book.” I like to sort the pictures into the space in front of  the divider they belong with, because it makes the divider tab easier to read. Sorting my photos for 2008 went very quickly.

Then I began to sort my memorabilia. This was not so quick, because I have been lazy for the past three years with the mementos I have collected! I’ve thrown tickets, programs, invitations, etc., into a box to look through later. One of these days I hope I learn my lesson and just sort the memorabilia as I collect it. At any rate, though it took longer, it was still easily managed and is now finished (along with that from 2009 and 2010)! I labeled my memorabilia folders using regular pencil as well.

Here is why I usually try to sort my photos first: while I’m sorting my memorabilia, I add a little asterisk to the label of the dividers my photos are sorted in for each section for which I have memorabilia. That way, while I’m laying out pages, when I come to a new section in my photos, I have a visual cue to tell me I need to look for the memorabilia that goes with them. It can be difficult to make room for the memorabilia after the pages are finished!

© Carolyn Gordon and Cropping with Care, 2011. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from Carolyn Gordon is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Carolyn Gordon and Cropping with Care with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. Carolyn Gordon is an independent consultant and the opinions and content on this site are not necessarily endorsed by Creative Memories. Power Sort is a trademark of Creative Memories.

Pictures Are Cheap; Memories Are Priceless

4 Jan

picture of flowersI’m not working on my 2008 family album project today, but I do want to share some numbers with you. My family took nearly 2500 pictures in 2008 (for which I kept the photo files; numerous others were deleted). Of those, I chose about 400 to print for this album. As I go through the next couple of steps toward completion, the number of pictures I’m using may get smaller still. (Some of the unprinted pictures I have are destined for other albums, but most won’t be used.)

My point is that you do not have to scrapbook every photo you take! Photography has come a long way in a short time. Taking digital pictures costs nothing, and prints are very inexpensive. It is more important to me that the events and the everyday of my family’s life are remembered and kept as a legacy for my children, than having every photo in an album. I can choose, celebrate, and display the best of the bunch! Editing down the number of photos I preserve in albums, and keeping my album-making and my album pages simple, are the main ways completed scrapbooks (whether traditional or digital) are possible for me.

Just something to consider! :) And by the way, even if I were to change my scrapbooking style to a highly designer-decorative one (and if I had that talent!), the steps I use to complete scrapbooks would remain the same. You artists out there can still follow along with the steps I’m laying out!

© Carolyn Gordon and Cropping with Care, 2011. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from Carolyn Gordon is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Carolyn Gordon and Cropping with Care with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. Carolyn Gordon is an independent consultant and the opinions and content on this site are not necessarily endorsed by Creative Memories.

Completion of a Traditional Scrapbook, Part 2: Order What You Need

3 Jan

Project SuppliesIn the first step of creating a traditional scrapbook, you made some decisions. The next step is ordering what you want to use but don’t have yet. For many of us, that will include ordering the coverset, pages, protectors, and decorative supplies we decided on. Luckily enough, what I want to use (shown here) was all in my inventory, so I just pulled it out for myself.

I did need to order prints of my photos, though. I opened up Memory Manager and chose to view the photos taken in 2008, went through to choose which ones I wanted to print, and edited red-eye out of a few of them that I hadn’t gotten to yet. This was really fun! One of the reasons I do this is that it is so enjoyable to look through memories! (Another thought that occurred to me is that I’m glad I have a better camera now than I did then. ;-) After that, I uploaded them to the Creative Memories Digital Center and ordered prints. (Uploading took the most time, but I didn’t need to sit at my computer — I got other things done while that was happening.)

If you are following along, do you have all your pictures printed that you want to have for this album? Do you have the supplies you want? If not, order them now! We’ll have a few days before I expect my prints in the mail (I’m not on a gift-giving deadline with this album), and the next step will involve something I can accomplish while I wait for them.

ETA: One more thing you might want to order at this time if you don’t have one is the Power Layouts Kit. I use it every time I complete a traditional scrapbook!

© Carolyn Gordon and Cropping with Care, 2011. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from Carolyn Gordon is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Carolyn Gordon and Cropping with Care with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. Carolyn Gordon is an independent consultant and the opinions and content on this site are not necessarily endorsed by Creative Memories. Memory Manager and Power Layouts are trademarks of Creative Memories. Product designs are © Creative Memories.